2022-2023

Table of Contents:

English
History and Social Science
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
World Languages
Theatre Arts
Music and Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Health and Physical Education
Support and Enrichment
CTE – Business and Information Technology
CTE – Health and Medical Science
CTE – JROTC
CTE – Agricultural Education
CTE – Marketing
CTE – Family and Consumer Science (Culinary)
CTE – Technology Education
CTE – Trade and Industrial Education
CTE – Rowanty Technical Center
CTE – John Tyler Community College
Appendix A – Academic Course Progressions

Secondary English Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
*** – SOL End of Course Exam OR CTE Certification applies to this course

English 6 ***

Required Course
Prerequisite: none

Description: English 6 is a literature-based curriculum integrating reading, writing, oral communication, and research. Students develop techniques needed for reading, analyzing, studying, writing, and information. Students learn to use grammar, spelling, and vocabulary correctly in all forms of communication. Literature includes short stories, novels, plays, poems, essays, and student-generated writing.

English 7 ***

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 6

Description: English 7 emphasizes the structure of language through the study of literature, writing, research, and oral communication skills. Students will be introduced to a variety of literature and literary devices through guided and independent reading. In addition, by modeling and with practice, students will expand the use of writing for appropriate audiences. Research will incorporate the use of organizational skills, source materials, and process-oriented products. Communication skills will also be emphasized regularly as part of the curriculum; this includes listening and speaking skills as well as vocabulary development. Students are expected to exercise reading, writing, and communication skills independently and with teacher direction.

English 8 ***

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 7

Description: English 8 emphasizes grammar, writing, and vocabulary skills. Students demonstrate knowledge of the writing process by writing informal essays and informal research reports with sources credited. The student read a variety of literature orally and analytically with a focus on literary elements and comprehension.

English 9

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 8

Description: English 9 emphasizes grammar and vocabulary skills and reading literature orally and analytically with class discussion.  These students use various literary forms in writing with revision, including formal essays and research with sources credited.

English 10

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 9

Description: English 10 emphasizes writing effectively in different modes using figurative and literal language depending on the audience, occasion, and purpose. The ability to define problems, to gather information through research, and to evaluate problems in a group or on an individual basis is also emphasized. Use of language and improvement of skills through the study of basic literary themes and literature from world culture is a focus of this course.

English 11 ***

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 10

Description: English 11 emphasizes the skills of critical reading, speaking, and writing. The study of American literature to gain insight into history and cultures, the study of writers’ styles as it relates to meaning, revision of writing to achieve sentence variety, persuasion techniques, and the synthesis of information from multiple sources are all elements of this course.

English 12

Required Course
Prerequisite: English 11

Description: English 12 requires students to demonstrate skills of oral and written persuasion, to increase their understanding of the range and depth of human experience through the study of literature, to write effective compositions including a documented research paper, and to recognize the process by which language changes.

Research and Writing

Grade Level: 10
Required Course (Writing Credit)
Note: May also take Technical Writing and Communications to satisfy the graduation requirement.
Prerequisite: English 9

Description: Research and Writing is designed for college-bound students and provides students the opportunity to learn and develop writing skills in a number of specific writing formats. Emphasis is placed on the writing process and on the requirements of each specific format, including the research paper. Technology will be incorporated into the writing process.

Technical Writing and Communications

Grade Level: 10
Required Course (writing credit)
Note: May also take Research and Writing to satisfy the graduation requirement.
Prerequisite: English 9

This course will emphasize the elements of good writing, including focus on grammar and mechanics. Students will study the preparation of workplace communications including memos, professional letters, resumes, and application letters. Students will also develop skills in persuasive writing and communication techniques.

Advanced Composition * (College Credits 111/112)

Grade Level: 11
Dual Enrollment Course
Prerequisite: English 10 and successful completion of college requirements to enter course

Introduces and develops critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with at least one researched essay. Students must maintain a “C” average at the end of each course to progress to the next (i.e. 111 to 112). Students may receive 6 college credits upon completing these courses.

American Literature * (College Credits 241/242)

Grade Level: 11
Dual Enrollment Course
Prerequisite: College Composition I & II

Description: American Literature I & II examines American literary works from Colonial times to the present, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of our national literature. This course involves critical reading and writing. Students may receive 6 college credits upon completing these courses. Students must maintain a “C” average at the end of each course to progress to the next (i.e. 241 to 242).

British (English) Literature * (College Credits 243/244) Last year offered 21-22

Grade Level: 12
Dual Enrollment Course
Prerequisite: DE American Literature

Description: British Literature studies major English works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present, emphasizing ideas and characteristics of the British literary tradition. This course involves critical reading and writing. Students may receive 6 college credits upon completing these courses. Students must maintain a “C” average at the end of each course to progress to the next (i.e. 243 to 244).

AP English 12 **

Grade Level: 12
AP Course
Note: This is a YEAR-LONG Course
Prerequisite: English 11

Description: English 12 requires students to demonstrate skills of oral and written persuasion, to increase their understanding of the range and depth of human experience through the study of literature, to write effective compositions including a documented research paper, and to recognize the process by which language changes.

Mythology

Grade Level: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: English 9

Description: The student will survey Greek and Roman, Norse, and other significant mythologies. The course will emphasize mythology’s role in literature and in the shaping of cultures. It will also survey the various theories about how myths began. Projects will include research into myths and their impact on modern language, vocabulary, literature, government, philosophy, drama, and science. Creative writing will also be a part of this course.

Creative Writing

Grade Level: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: English 9

Description: Creative Writing is designed for the student who already enjoys writing fiction and poetry and wants to take his/her skill to a higher level. This elective will be centered around the creative writing process, emphasizing short story, poetry, and dramatic (play) writing. Students will put final copies of their work into published form, which includes reading all assignments out loud in class. Projects may include sending finished work to a publisher, creating and editing a literary magazine, and putting together a folder of student writing to be submitted to VHSL for state evaluation and judging.
Vocabulary and reading will also be part of this elective.

Yearbook I-IV (formerly Journalism & Yearbook)

Grade Level: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Instructor Recommendation; Application Required

Description: First-year students will learn to do basic layouts, write stories and captions suitable for publications, take photographs, and will do work as assigned to them by other staff members and the sponsor. First-year students are strongly encouraged to attend the yearbook workshop during the summer to learn skills they will need. Potential positions may include the following: writer, artist, layout artist, and typist. Second-year students will advance in their areas(s) of mastery. They are expected to set a good example to first-year students of how a staff works together to finish a product. They supervise, help to evaluate other staff members’ work, train new staff, and coordinate yearbook efforts. Second-year students seeking editorial positions are strongly urged to attend the workshop during the summer. Potential positions may include the following: editor, assistant editor, layout manager, copy editor, business manager, and photo editor.

School News & Journalism (formerly: Photojournalism)

Grade Level: 9-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: none

Description: This course will emphasize the elements of good writing, including focus on grammar and mechanics. Students will study the preparation of workplace communications including memos, professional letters, resumes, and application letters. Students will also develop skills in persuasive writing and communication techniques.

Public Speaking

Grade level: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: none

Description: This course will focus on public speaking skills, presenting and defending ideas and thoughts in a public
forum. Students will study the components of public speaking, and will present numerous oral presentations as part of this
course. Students may continue this study in Advanced Speech.

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Secondary History and Social Sciences Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
*** – SOL End of Course Exam OR CTE Certification applies to this course

U.S. History to 1865

Grade 6
Required Course

Description: 6th grade students will use skills of historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union. This course of study follows the history of the United States from pre-Columbian times until 1865.  Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography as they study United States history in chronological sequence and learn about change and continuity in our history. They also will study documents and speeches that laid the foundation of American ideals and institutions and will examine the everyday life of people at different times in the country’s history through the use of primary and secondary sources.

U.S. History – 1865 to Present

Grade 7
Required Course

Description: 7th grade students will continue to use skills of historical and geographical analysis as they examine American history since 1865. This course of study follows the history of the United States from the end of the Reconstruction era to the present. Students continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography within the context of Untied States history. Political, economic, and social challenges facing the nation reunited after civil war will be examined chronologically as students develop an understanding of how the American experience shaped the world political and economic landscape.

Civics and Economics ***

Grade 8
Required Course

Description: The standards for Civics and Economics examine the roles the citizens play in the political, governmental, and economic systems in the United States. Students will examine the constitutions of Virginia and the United States, will identify the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens, and will describe the structure and operation of government at the local, state, and national levels. Students will investigate the process by which decisions are made in the American market economy and explain the government’s role in it. The standards identify personal character traits, such as patriotism, respect for the law, willingness to perform public service, and a sense of civic duty, that facilitate thoughtful and effective active participation in the civic life of an increasingly diverse democratic society.

Civic education also emphasizes the intellectual and practical skills required for responsible citizenship. Students will practice these skills both inside and outside the classroom as they extend their understanding of the essential knowledge defined by the standards for Civics and Economics.

World Geography ***

Grades: 9-12
Required Course
Note: Students may also take World History or AP Human Geography to satisfy the graduation requirement.

Description: This course is designed to give the students an opportunity to examine the physical features of the earth such as global, land, water forms, climates, natural resources, and the cultural and environmental relationship between the peoples of the major regions of the world.

AP Human Geography **

Grades: 10-12
History Course to satisfy graduation requirement (alternative World History)

Description: Advanced Placement Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students will study diverse peoples and areas organized around concepts that include location and place, scale, pattern, spatial organization, and regionalization. They will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Student work will be required outside of class time.

World History & Geography to 1500 A.D. ***

Grades 9-10
Required Course
Note: Students may also take World Geography; for 21-22 there will be a pre-AP section to prepare students for AP History and AP Human Geography (this will receive AL credit and thus replace that section)

Description: Students will explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until about 1500 A.D. Students will study the origins of much of our heritage using texts, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, charts, chronological skills, inquiry/research skills, and technology skills.

World History & Geography – 1500 A.D. to Present ***

Grades: 9-11
Required Course
Prerequisite: World History and Geography to 1500

Description: This course covers history and geography from the late Middle Ages (1500 AD) to the present with emphasis on Western Europe. Geographic influences on history continue to be explored, by increasing attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nation-states. Significant attention will be given to the ways in which scientific and technological revolutions created new economic conditions that in turn produced social and political changes. The people and events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries will be emphasized for their strong connections to contemporary issues. The standards strike a balance between the broad themes of history and the probing of specific historic events, ideas, issues and persons. Using texts, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, charts, and a variety of chronological, inquiry/research, technological skills, students develop competence in chronological thinking historical comprehension, and historical analysis.

AP World History  **  ***

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course (satisfies graduation requirements for advanced diploma – students taking this course do not need to take World History 1500-present)

Description: Students in this course must learn to view history thematically and how to look at history in a global perspective. The AP World History course is centered on five themes that connect all subjects covered in the course; this will help students relate to the “Big Picture” or major concepts throughout history. The themes also provide a way to organize, compare and analyze change and continuity over time. All subjects will in essence be related back to the five themes: Interaction between humans and the environment, Development and interaction of cultures, State-building, Expansion, and interaction of economic systems, Development and, transformation of social structures.

Students will read on a nightly basis, and will have other supplemental activities or homework to do outside of class. Some of these things include: vocabulary, reading primary sources, projects, papers, maps, etc.

Please note that unless students have already done so you will be taking the World History II SOL.

VA & U.S. History  ***

Grade 11
Required Course

Description: This course encompasses the development of American ideals and institutions through the study of major events, eras, documents, and personalities of Virginia and United States history from the Age of Exploration to the modern era.  This course provides a perspective on the relationship between past and contemporary issues.

Dual Enrollment U.S. History *

Grade 11
Elective Course (Meets the course requirements for graduation)
Prerequisite: World History to 1500 A.D.

Description: United States History is the most comprehensive study of our nation’s history that is offered at Dinwiddie High School. This course will explore in depth the “change over time” which has shaped our country and the institutions therein. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth the chronological and thematic threads which have shaped the United States. Students will master the names, dates, events and legislation of our country’s history, and examine the perspectives of historians who often disagree as to the motivations and accomplishments of our historical figures and events. During this class students will fully analyze the cause and effect of the changes which have taken place from exploration to the present. Moreover, students will analyze and interpret various forms of historical expression including charts, graphs, documents, cartoons, letters and speeches.

AP U.S. History **  *** Last year offered 21-22

Grade 11
AP Course (Meets the course requirements for graduation)
Prerequisite: World History to 1500 A.D.

Description: Advanced Placement United States History is the most comprehensive study of our nation’s history that is offered at Dinwiddie High School. This course will explore in depth the “change over time” which has shaped our country and the institutions therein. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth the chronological and thematic threads which have shaped the United States. Students will master the names, dates, events and legislation of our country’s history, and examine the perspectives of historians who often disagree as to the motivations and accomplishments of our historical figures and events. During this class students will fully analyze the cause and effect of the changes which have taken place from exploration to the present. Moreover, students will analyze and interpret various forms of historical expression including charts, graphs, documents, cartoons, letters and speeches. Finally, students will be prepared to take a national examination in May which can qualify for college credit.

VA and U.S. Government

Grade 12
Required Course

Description: Students will identify the three branches of government, including the functions, the heads, and representatives for the national, state and local levels. Analysis of the United States Constitution and the Virginia Constitution will include the comparison and contrast for each. Students will explore the rights and responsibilities as citizens of the United States.

AP U.S Government and Politics **

Grade 12
Elective Course (Meets requirements for graduation)

Description: The Advanced Placement Government & Politics curriculum reflects the content of a college level course, and is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarly with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up our political reality. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the basic values of American politics, how the major political institutions operate, and what direction and policies may be expected in the future. The students in this course will also examine and analyze our four basic governmental institutions (the presidency, the federal courts, congress and the bureaucracy) and the processes of government, including elections, interest groups, the role of the media, political participation, and the Bill of Rights. Our political heritage and the philosophy of representative government will shape this course.

Psychology

Elective Course
Grades: 10 -12

Description: The student will explore the effects of biological & environmental effects on personality and behavior of the individual. The students will be required to demonstrate their knowledge of the topics via any number of assessments including but not limited to tests, quizzes, papers, essay, projects, group work, reading, homework, classwork, and classroom discussion.

AP Psychology  **

Note: Currently this is offered online through Virtual Virginia.

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course

Description: Advanced Placement Psychology provides an overview of current psychological theory and practice. Students will explore the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans and other animals. Students will be exposed to the principles, concepts and phenomena associated with major subfields within psychology, including biological bases of behavior, cognitive and emotional processes, and diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders. In accordance with the driving principles of current psychological practice, this course will emphasize scientific method and procedure, ethical standards in research, and critical thinking skills. Student academic performance is expected to meet or exceed the rigorous requirements of an introductory-level college survey course. Student work will be required outside of class time.

Sociology

Grade 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisites: None

Description: Students will study the various interactions of individuals, groups, and cultures. Students will read, write, discuss, and participate in projects in this course.

African American History

Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: B or higher in English & History courses

Description: This course will examine the ancient empires of Africa and their contributions to the modern world; the impact of imperialism on the continent’s social, environmental, and economic structures; African civil rights leaders and the independence movements that they led; as well as the challenges that the continent faces today. This course focuses on the history, culture, arts and literature of Africans and African-Americans. The major goal of the course is to begin to develop an appreciation for the diversity of intellectual and artistic forms as a prelude to interdisciplinary multi-cultural activities.

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Secondary Mathematics Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
*** – SOL End of Course Exam OR CTE Certification applies to this course

Math 1 and 1E ***

Grade 6
Required Course

Description: Mathematics 1 is geared toward preparing students for the study of algebra.  Problem solving, proportional reasoning, and mathematical applications are emphasized. Problem solving is integrated throughout all areas of study so students can develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types. Emphases will be placed on problems involving consumer applications, proportional reasoning, and computation with integers. Opportunities for the student to acquire the specialized vocabulary and language patterns of mathematics are provided throughout each strand.

Math 2 and 2E ***

Grade 7
Required Course

Description: The seventh-grade standards continue to emphasize the foundations of algebra. The standards address the concept of and operations with rational numbers by continuing their study from grade six. Students will build on the concept of ratios to solve problems involving proportional reasoning. Students will solve problems involving volume and surface area and focus on the relationships among the properties of quadrilaterals. Probability is investigated through comparing experimental results to theoretical expectations. Students continue to develop their understanding of solving linear equations and inequalities in one variable by applying the properties of real numbers. Students discern between proportional and non-proportional relationships and begin to develop a concept of slope as rate of change.

Math 3 ***

Grade 8
Required Course

Description: The eighth-grade standards continue to build on the concepts needed for success in high school level algebra, geometry, and statistics. Students will explore real numbers and the subsets of the real number system. Proportional reasoning is expounded upon as students solve a variety of problems. Students find the volume and surface area of more complex three-dimensional figures and apply transformations to geometric shapes in the coordinate plane. Students will verify and apply the Pythagorean Theorem creating a foundation for further study of triangular relationships in geometry. Students will represent data, both univariate and bivariate data, and make predictions by observing data patterns. Students build upon the algebraic concepts developed in the standards for grades six and seven mathematics, which include simplifying algebraic expressions, solving multistep equations and inequalities, and graphing linear functions. The grade eight standards are vital to providing a solid foundation in Algebra I for students in middle school mathematics.

Algebra I ***

Grades: 8-9
Required Course

Description: The study of algebraic thinking begins in kindergarten and is progressively formalized prior to the study of the algebraic content found in the Algebra I Standards of Learning.  Included in the progression of algebraic content is patterning, generalization of arithmetic concepts, proportional reasoning, and representing mathematical relationships using tables, symbols, and graphs. All students are expected to achieve the Algebra I standards. The study of Algebra I assists students in generalizing patterns or modeling relevant, practical situations with algebraic models.  In order to assist students in developing meaning and connecting algebraic concepts to geometry and statistics, consideration should be given to the sequential development of concepts and skills by using concrete materials to assist students in making the transition from the numeric to the symbolic. Connections between Algebra I and other subject areas through practical applications may assist in helping students attach meaning to the abstract concepts of algebra.

Algebra Functions and Data Analysis

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course – Satisfies math graduation requirements
Prerequisite: Algebra I

Description: This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the standards for Algebra I and may benefit from additional support in their transition to Algebra II. Within the context of mathematical modeling and data analysis, students will study functions and their behaviors, systems of inequalities, probability, experimental design and implementation, and analysis of data. Data will be generated through practical applications arising from science, business, and finance. Students will solve problems that require the formulation of linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic equations or a system of equations.

Algebra II ***

Grades 9-12
Required Course
Prerequisite: Algebra I (Recommended AFDA)

Description: Students enrolled in Algebra II are assumed to have mastered those concepts outlined in the Algebra I standards. A thorough treatment of advanced algebraic concepts will be provided through the study of functions, equations, inequalities, systems of equations, polynomials, rational and radical equations, complex numbers, and sequences and series. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications and modeling throughout the course of study. Oral and written communication concerning the language of algebra, logic of procedures, and interpretation of results should also permeate the course.

Geometry ***

Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Algebra I and AFDA or Algebra II

Description: This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the standards for Algebra I. All students are expected to achieve the Geometry standards. The course includes an emphasis on developing reasoning skills through the exploration of geometric relationships including properties of geometric figures, trigonometric relationships, and mathematical proofs. In this course, deductive reasoning and logic are used in direct proofs. Direct proofs are presented in different formats (typically two-column or paragraph) and employ definitions, postulates, theorems, and algebraic justifications including coordinate methods.

Math Capstone

Grade 12
Elective Course
Prerequisites for the 12th-grade (senior level) course include earning verified credits in mathematics and satisfactory completion of either Algebra, Functions, and Data Analysis or Algebra II. Students seeking the Advanced Studies Diploma, whose course sequences include the Mathematics Capstone course, must also take Algebra II.

Description: The math capstone course contains high-interest contextualized content designed to give certain students an additional boost for competent and successful entry into college and careers. The course will add to students’ preparation for college and the workplace by 1) enhancing skills in number and quantity, functions and algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability; and 2) simultaneously reinforcing readiness skills and dispositions in adaptability and flexibility, creativity and innovation, leadership, team work, collaboration, and work ethic.

Trigonometry

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Algebra II with a C or higher

Description: Trigonometry includes the study of trigonometric definitions, applications, graphing, and solving trigonometric equations and inequalities. Emphasis should also be placed on using connections between right triangle ratios, trigonometric functions, and circular functions. In addition, applications and modeling should be included throughout the course of study. Oral and written communication concerning the language of mathematics, logic of procedure, and interpretation of results should also permeate the course.

Math Analysis/Precalculus

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Trigonometry

Description: Students enrolled in Mathematical Analysis are assumed to have mastered Geometry and Algebra II concepts. Mathematical Analysis develops students’ understanding of algebraic and transcendental functions, parametric and polar equations, sequences and series, and vectors. The content of this course serves as appropriate preparation for a calculus course.

DE Precalculus * (College Credits 161/162)

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course – Dual Enrollment
Prerequisite: Trigonometry with a B or higher

Description: This course is designed to prepare college bound students for a first course in calculus. The topics presented are prerequisites for calculus. The presentation of these topics develops an intuitive base and some of the working tools for the study of more advanced mathematics. The format and development provide a transition between high school and college texts. Intermediate algebra, analytic geometry, and trigonometry are integrated with other important topics in mathematics by an approach that stresses functions. The following concepts are covered: functions and their graphs, transformation of functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations; applications of these algebraic concepts to other disciplines.

AP Calculus **

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Precalculus with a B or higher

Description: This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. It is assumed that they have acquired a sound understanding of the theory of elementary functions. This course is a college level course. Students who score high enough on the Advanced Placement Test may receive college credit for this class.

AP Statistics and Probability **

Grade Level: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 and Trigonometry required, preferred: Precalculus with C or higher.

Description: Statistics is the study of variation. Data, a set of numbers with context, change frequently. Statistics helps to make conclusions, and ultimately predictions, about this variation. This course will provide various methods of data reasoning as well as skills to interpret the data.

Probability and Statistics

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisites: Algebra II

Description: The purpose of the course is to present basic concepts and techniques for collecting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and making predictions. Graphing utilities (calculators, computers, and other technology tools) will be used to assist in teaching and learning. Graphing utilities facilitate visualizing, analyzing, and understanding algebraic and statistical behaviors and provide a powerful tool for solving and verifying solutions.

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Secondary Science Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
*** – SOL End of Course Exam OR CTE Certification applies to this course

Science 6

Grade 6
Required Course

Description: The sixth-grade standards continue to emphasize data analysis and experimentation. Methods are studied for testing the validity of predictions and conclusions. Scientific methodology, focusing on precision in stating hypotheses and defining dependent and independent variables, is strongly reinforced. The concept of change is explored through the study of transformations of energy and matter. The standards present an integrated focus on the role of the sun’s energy in Earth’s systems, on water in the environment, on air and atmosphere, and on basic chemistry concepts. A more detailed understanding of the solar system and space exploration becomes a focus of instruction. Natural resource management, its relation to public policy, and cost/benefit tradeoffs in conservation policies are introduced.

Life Science

Grade 7
Required Course

Description: The Life Science standards emphasize a more complex understanding of change, cycles, patterns, and relationships in the living world. Students build on basic principles related to these concepts by exploring the cellular organization and the classification of organisms; the dynamic relationships among organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems; and change as a result of the transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Inquiry skills at this level include organization and mathematical analysis of data, manipulation of variables in experiments, and identification of sources of experimental error. Metric units (SI – International System of Units) are expected to be used as the primary unit of measurement to gather and report data at this level.

Physical Science ***

Grade 8
Required Course
NOTE: The Physical Science SOL assessment includes content from Science 6 and Life Science.

Description: The Physical Science standards continue to build on skills of systematic investigation with a clear focus on variables and repeated trials. Validating conclusions using evidence and data becomes increasingly important at this level. Students will plan and conduct research involving both classroom experimentation and literature reviews from written and electronic resources. Research methods and skills highlight practical problems and questions. Students will share their work using written reports and other presentations and will continue to use metric units (SI – International System of Units) as the primary unit of measurement for gathering and reporting data. The Physical Science standards stress an in-depth understanding of the nature and structure of matter and the characteristics of energy. The standards place considerable emphasis on the technological application of physical science principles. Major areas covered by the standards include the organization and use of the periodic table; physical and chemical changes; nuclear reactions; temperature and heat; sound; light; electricity and magnetism; and work, force, and motion.

Environmental Science

Grade: 9
Elective Science Course

Description: This course includes the study of many components of our environment, including the human impact on our planet.  These outcomes focus on scientific inquiry, the physical world, the living environment, resource conservation, humans’ impact on the environment, and legal and civic responsibility.  Instruction should focus on student data collection and analysis through laboratory experiences and field work. These should include descriptive and comparative studies as well as investigation (i.e. meaningful watershed educational experiences). It is expected that teachers will collaborate with museums, aquaria, nature centers, government agencies, associations, foundations, and private industry in efforts to engage the community, provide diverse points of view about the management of natural resources, and offer a variety of learning experiences and career education opportunities.

Earth Science ***

Grade 9-10
Science course that satisfied 1 science credit necessary for graduation

Description: Students work individually, in groups, and as a class on activities that model or duplicate processes on Earth. The course deals with such topics as man’s effect on the earth, the structure of matter, forces, fields, energy, topographic maps, earth motions, the seasons, time, the water cycle, the rock cycle (including weathering and erosion), the formation of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks, mountain building, movement of the earth’s crust, the geological time scale, meteorology (including clouds, weather instruments, fronts), oceanography, astronomy, and geology (volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics).

Oceanography (Earth Science II)

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course

Description: Oceanography is the study of water of the ocean, the life within the ocean and the solid Earth beneath the ocean.  The course will take a look at the ocean currents, tides, marine life, ocean chemistry, wave formation, plate tectonics, atmospheric conditions and humans effects on the ocean.  The student will participate in labs, discussions and class activities centered on ocean issues such as pollution, water chemistry, ocean currents and marine organisms.

Biology ***

Grade 10-11
Required Course
Prerequisite: Earth Science

Description: The Biology standards are designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of living systems. Emphasis continues to be placed on the skills necessary to examine alternative scientific explanations, actively conduct controlled experiments, analyze and communicate information, and gather and use information in scientific literature. The history of biological thought and the evidence that supports it are explored, providing the foundation for investigating biochemical life processes, cellular organization, mechanisms of inheritance, dynamic relationships among organisms, and the change in organisms through time. The importance of scientific research that validates or challenges ideas is emphasized at this level. All students are expected to achieve the content of the biology standards.ecology, evolution, genetics and taxonomy.

Anatomy (Biology II)

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Biology (Suggested: Chemistry)

Description: This course is open to students who have completed Biology and plan on taking a college anatomy course. The course will stress information essential to students who plan to enter the medical profession (any healthcare related position). The course will focus on human anatomy and physiology, along with related medical conditions. Students will use critical thinking skills to solve case studies. This course uses a college text and requires students to use time management skills. The ability and willingness to memorize is essential. Labs include modern diagnostic procedures.

Ecology (Biology II)

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Biology

Description: This course is open to any student who has passed biology and needs a third science.  Students will study (1) the interrelationships of plants and animals, and the effects of abiotic environmental factors upon these organisms;  (2) plant morphology; (3) biome comparisons; (4) oceans, including the Chesapeake Bay; (5) conservation and management practices for forests, soil, wildlife, and water; (6) land use management; (7) current ecological issues such as endangered wildlife, groundwater contamination, and waste management.  Outside activities will be conducted during the course to allow for hands-on experience so students must be willing to go outside at various times throughout the semester.

Chemistry ***

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Earth Science, Biology, and Algebra II

Description: The Chemistry standards are designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the interaction of matter and energy. This interaction is investigated through the use of laboratory techniques, manipulation of chemical quantities, and problem-solving applications. Scientific methodology is employed in experimental and analytical investigations, and concepts are illustrated with current practical applications that should include examples from environmental, nuclear, organic, and biochemistry content areas.

Physics

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisites: Chemistry and Algebra II (Suggested Trigonometry)

Description: The course is designed to give the students an introduction to the laws and methods of physics and in particular, to examine the various subdivisions, i.e., kinematics, dynamics, vectors, gravity, electricity, energy, magnetism, and optics. The students’ critical thinking and reasoning skills will be challenged. The students develop problem-solving techniques using physics as the knowledge base.

AP Chemistry **

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed a general high school chemistry course and Algebra II. It is also recommended by College Board that the student have completed trigonometry and completed or currently enrolled in Physics I.

Description: AP Chemistry is comparable to a college level general chemistry course and laboratory. When a student has successfully completed this course and the AP Examination, this course may fulfill the college requirement for freshman chemistry and/or laboratory. This course is designed to prepare students for college level science courses in general by better adapting them to the inquiry based learning, higher level thinking, and in depth math skills that they will be expected to use in college.

A minimum of 25% of class time will be spent performing hand-on laboratory activities. There are sixteen labs included in the following units. During the laboratory, students are expected to focus on the procedure, make quality observations, and report all data that is observed. It is highly recommended that you take your AP Chemistry laboratory notebook to college as some faculty may ask to review it before awarding credit to the laboratory. Students will be working in groups of two and must be able to communicate and collaborate with each other. Each student is expected to maintain their own lab notebook and provide a report for each lab that is performed. Each lab report will have a section that needs to be completed pre lab, during the lab, and post lab.

DE General Biology I & II *

Grade 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Biology (preferably Biology AL)

Note: Students must also pass the placement test through John Tyler Community College.

BIO 101- General Biology I

Focuses on foundations in cellular structure, metabolism, and genetics in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of biology to society. Part I of a two-course sequence.

BIO 102- General Biology II  Part II of a two-course sequence.

Focuses on diversity of life, anatomy and physiology of organisms, and ecosystem organization and processes in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of Describe the levels of organization of multicellular organisms.

Astronomy (Earth Science II)

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Earth Science

Description: Astronomy- The study of space including the Big Bang theory; and the origin and evolution of stars, star systems, and galaxies. This will also include position of Earth in the solar system; sun-Earth-moon relationships (seasons, tides, and eclipses); characteristics of the sun, planets and their moons, comets, meteors, and asteroids; and the history and contributions of space exploration.

Genetics (Biology II)

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Biology (Suggested: Chemistry)

Description: This course focuses on structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

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World Language Courses

Additional World Languages are available online through Virtual Virginia and Apex Learning programs.
To meet the requirements of the Advanced Diploma, students must complete three years of one language or two years of two different languages.

World Languages Exploratory I & II

Grades: 6-7
Elective Course

Description: This course provides an introduction to languages and beginning conversational skills in French and Spanish. An understanding of language development and Latin will also be introduced.

Spanish Conversation and Culture

Grades 8-12
Prerequisite: none
Elective Course (8th grade students can earn a high school credit; however, this course does not meet foreign language sequence requirements for the advanced diploma)

Description: This course will allow students to explore the culture and geography of Spanish speaking countries. Students will experience food, art, and music as they explore the Spanish culture and heritage.

Spanish I

Grades: 8-12
Elective Course (8th grade students can earn a high school credit)
Prerequisite: B or higher in English or teacher recommendation for 8th grade students

Description:  In this level students will develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.  After learning basics such as the letters of the alphabet, numbers, and rules of capitalization and punctuation, students will use the language in everyday situations such as telling time, giving dates, stating their needs/wants, talking about their school and classes, and describing people and things.  Lessons are presented in specific locations around the Spanish-speaking world so that students develop an overview of the history, geography, art, music, and customs of the people whose language they are studying.

Spanish II

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Spanish I

Description: In this level students continue refining their skills by identifying and describing family members, discussing family activities, asking for and giving advice, making plans, extending and accepting invitations, ordering meals in a restaurant, commenting on clothes, and describing moods and physical conditions.  They will use more complex grammatical structures including object pronouns and the preterite tense. They will become more knowledgeable about transportation, meals, shopping, fashion, sports, festivities, and the family’s role in Spanish-speaking countries.

Spanish III

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Spanish II

Description: In this level students will continue to refine skills in the target language by expressing likes and dislikes and talking about what they and others like to do.  They will express feelings, make suggestions and respond to suggestions. They will ask for help and offer information, describe their city or town, describe daily routines, responsibilities and hobbies.  Students will give commands and explanations, relate a series of events, and order food in a restaurant. They will read about and discover the Hispanic cultural aspects associated with Andalucía, Valle de Mexico, and Texas.

Spanish IV

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Spanish III

Description: In this level students will continue to refine skills in the target language by using the imperfect to describe what they used to do, what they liked and disliked, to describe people and things in the past.  They will use equal comparisons to describe people and things, will ask for and give directions, will ask for help in stores, will talk about how clothes look and fit, and how to bargain in the market. Further, they will set a scene for a story, continue and end a story.  They will discuss the latest news and react to the news. They will read about and discover the Hispanic cultural aspects associated with the Caribbean, the Andes, and California.

Spanish V

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Spanish IV

Description: In this level students will review descriptions, asking for information, asking for and giving advice, and talk about taking care of themselves.  Students will express ideas about what has happened and will express and support a point of view. They will talk about future events, describe how foods taste and discuss unintentional events.  They will express hopes and wishes, what needs to be done, and opinions. They will make suggestions and recommendations, and turn down invitations. They will read about and discover the Hispanic cultural aspects associated with La Coruña, Caracas, and Guadalajara.

American Sign Language I

Pilot year 2022-23
Grades: 9th graders only for ASL 1, Facilitated by DHS on VVA platform

Description: This course provides an introduction to the basic skills in production and comprehension of American Sign Language (ASL). The course focuses on the alphabet, numbers, fingerspelling, vocabulary, and grammar which will lead to increased communicative and cultural proficiency in ASL. The culture, history, current events, and traditions of the deaf community are introduced through selected readings, visual recordings, and other authentic materials. Each student should be able to carry on a short conversation with another student by the end of the course. Also, students will develop the practical skills and knowledge necessary for basic interactions within the deaf community.

American Sign Language I-III

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Currently these course offerings are available through Virtual Virginia.

Arabic I-III

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Currently these course offerings are available through Virtual Virginia.

Chinese I-IV

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Currently these course offerings are available through Virtual Virginia.

French I-IV

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Currently these course offerings are available through Virtual Virginia.

Latin I-IV

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Currently these course offerings are available through Virtual Virginia.

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Theatre Arts Courses

Theatre I/Intro to Theatre

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Requirement: Must see one DHS production as a test grade

Description: Students will learn the basics to performance and the theatre world. Students must audition for next level.

Stagecraft (Theatre II) & Intermediate Acting and Play-writing (Theatre III)

Theatre II: Stagecraft
Theatre III: Intermediate Acting and Play-writing (for the elementary schools)

Requirement(s)- Assist with tech week as a major test grade (the week before the show); must be able to stay after one day to help. Must see one DHS performance for a test grade.

Descriptions: Stagecraft will include performance and well as scenery work. Intermediate Acting and Play-writing will include acting methods and producing pieces for the children’s camp as well as student showcases.

Audition for next level

Technical Theatre (Theatre IV) & Directing and Advanced Theatre Studies (Theatre V)

Theatre IV: Technical Theatre
Theatre V: Directing and Advanced Theatre Studies

Requirements: Must assist all three days of the show and strike. The after school commitment minimum is four days.

Descriptions: Students will learn the basics about operating booth equipment and use such knowledge to direct a performance. Students will teach their own lessons based on interest.

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Music/Performing Arts Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

General Music

Grades: 6-8

Description: Students demonstrate proper care of the instrument. They will practice basic positions. Students read and perform music of varying styles and levels of difficulty.

Introduction to DMS Band

Elective Course
Grades: 6-8

Description: This class is designed for students who are interested in starting an instrument for the first time. The primary focus for this class is basic instrumental skill development and music reading. Only the following band instruments are offered to beginners: flute, clarinet, Alto Saxophone, trumpet, Baritone and trombone.

This class requires two performances, 1 each semester. Students must acquire their own instrument.

Intermediate DMS Band

Grades: 7-8
Prerequisite: Intro to Band or teacher recommendation

Description: In this course, students will expand their knowledge of skills learned in the previous year and will continue to refine their technical skills as well as enhance their performance through musical expression.

Students may audition for percussion during this class.
2 performances and students must have their own instrument.

Beginning Band I

Grades: 8 – 10
Elective Course

Requirement- Must participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s).

Note: 8th graders earn high school credit for “Beginning Band” if they are recommended by the teacher and have taken Introduction to Band and Intermediate Band. Joint activities and shared music compositions between 8/9th grade.

Description: This course will enable students to begin receiving instruction on wind instrument of their choice with guidance from the music teacher. Instruction may begin at any high school grade level. Students demonstrate proper care of the instrument and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production, and they count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 1 and 2 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students begin to describe, respond to, interpret, and evaluate works of music and create basic variations of simple melodies. Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, and regional events.

Intermediate Band 2  and Music Appreciation/Theory

Advanced Band 3 and Music Theory

Artist Band 4 and AP Music Theory **

Elective Courses — First course will be in the first semester and second course will be in the second semester.  Must take both courses.
Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 1-2 years of band class in middle/ high school
Requirement: Must participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s).

Description: Students demonstrate proper care of the instrument and become familiar with the technology of the instrument. They demonstrate basic positions, fingerings, and tone production, and they count, read, and perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 2-4 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, and regional events.

Music Theory and Appreciation: Music theory is an integral part  of developing successful musicians. Students will learn basic theory through more advanced concepts related to the selected music pieces in Band 2 and 3. Each year the expectation and theory concepts will build to enable students to successfully complete AP Music Theory.

In AP Music Theory, students develop their aural, sight-singing, written, compositional, and analytical skills through a series of listening, performance, written, creative, and analytical exercises. The course covers the mastery of the rudiments and terminology of music, with an emphasis on speed and fluency. The course then progresses to more sophisticated and creative tasks, including melodic and harmonic dictation; composition of a bass line for a given melody implying appropriate harmony; realization of a figured bass; realization of a Roman numeral progression; analysis of repertoire, including melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form; and sight-singing.

Percussion I & General Music

Elective Course
Grades: 9-12

Description: Demonstrate stick grip for snare drum and mallets; basic tuning of timpani; setup of timpani, mallet instruments, and auxiliary instruments; perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 2–4 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Ensemble skills become more developed as students participate in intermediate-level ensemble settings. Learn and demonstrate 13 Standard Rudiments and Lesson 25, open-close-open, on snare drum (PAS); tuning timpani while playing; playing techniques on timpani, mallet, and auxiliary instruments, including single-stroke roll. Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

Requirement: Marching Band Drum line members must enroll in class and participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s)

Percussion II-IV

Elective Course
Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 1-2 years of band class in middle/ high school. Percussion instrumentalists only.

Description: Demonstrate stick grip for snare drum and mallets; basic tuning of timpani; setup of timpani, mallet instruments, and auxiliary instruments; perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 2–4 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Ensemble skills become more developed as students participate in intermediate-level ensemble settings. Learn and demonstrate 40 Standard Rudiments and Lesson 25, open-close-open, on snare drum (PAS); three-mallet technique on mallet percussion; multiple percussion techniques on auxiliary percussion instruments; timpani technique on three or four drums; tuning drums to reference pitches; making changes during performance. Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

Requirement: Marching Band Drum line members must enroll in class and participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s)

Small Instrument Ensemble/Jazz  I

Elective Course
Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 1-2 years of band class in middle/ high school; Audition or consent of instructor

Description: Enable students to acquire more advanced technical and expressive skills and demonstrate a mature level of musicianship. Students demonstrate a variety of articulations, bowings, positions, alternate fingerings, and vibrato while playing the required scales, arpeggios, and rudiments in more complex rhythmic patterns. Through playing, improvising, and writing, students create expressive rhythmic and melodic variations. They perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 4 and 5 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

Requirement: Must participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s)

Jazz II-IV

Elective Course
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 1-2 years of band class in middle/ high school; Audition or consent of instructor

Description: Enable students to acquire more advanced technical and expressive skills and demonstrate a mature level of musicianship. Students demonstrate a variety of articulations, bowings, positions, alternate fingerings, and vibrato while playing the required scales, arpeggios, and rudiments in more complex rhythmic patterns. Through playing, improvising, and writing, students create expressive rhythmic and melodic variations. They perform music at Solo Literature Grade Levels 4 and 5 of the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors Association (VBODA). Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

Requirement- Must participate in after-school rehearsals; concert(s)

Guitar I

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Note: Students must have an acoustic guitar OR have a rental arrangement with DHS guitar teacher. Must bring their guitar to school daily.

Description: Students demonstrate proper care of the instrument. Students differentiate between various types of guitars. They demonstrate basic positions, right-hand and left-hand techniques, and tone production. Students read and perform music of varying styles and levels of difficulty. Students create compositions for guitar accompaniments and melodies.

Guitar Level 2

Elective Course
Grades: 10-12

Note: Students must have an acoustic guitar OR have a rental arrangement with DHS guitar teacher. Must bring their guitar to school daily.

Description: Students demonstrate proper care of the instrument. Students differentiate between various types of guitars. They demonstrate basic positions, right-hand and left-hand techniques, and tone production. Students read and perform music of varying styles and levels of difficulty. Students create compositions for guitar accompaniments and melodies.

Chorus 6

Elective Course

Description: This class is for the beginning middle school singer. The major emphasis of this course is on singing activities and vocal production, but students will also learn the basics of musical literacy, music history musical notation. Students will study a variety of historically and culturally diverse styles of music to perform during the year.

Performance Requirement – 2 concerts per year, plus any additional concerts as designated by director.

Chorus 7

Elective Course

Description: This class is for the beginning middle school singer. The major emphasis of this course is on singing activities and vocal production, but students will also learn the basics of musical literacy, music history musical notation. Students will study a variety of historically and culturally diverse styles of music to perform during the year.

Performance Requirement – 2 concerts per year, plus any additional concerts as designated by director.

Chorus 8

Elective Course

Description: This class is for the beginning middle school singer. The major emphasis of this course is on singing activities and vocal production, but students will also learn the basics of musical literacy, music history musical notation. Students will study a variety of historically and culturally diverse styles of music to perform during the year.

Performance Requirement – 2 concerts per year, plus any additional concerts as designated by director.

Chorus I-IV

Elective Course
Grades: 9-12

Note: Students must participate in all performance/competitions during their semester in chorus. Students must be willing to sing daily.

Description: Students will obtain musical knowledge and skills in the choral setting. Students begin to develop choral skills, including singing in unison and two/three-part harmony with emphasis on vocal production and technique. Students explore and perform music in a variety of music styles. They develop an understanding of expected concert etiquette. Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

Chamber Choir I-III

Elective Course
Grades: 10-12

Requirements: Auditioned class for 10-12th grade. Students must have successfully passed one previous high school level chorus class and is required to rent/purchase choir dress or tux. Members must participate in all performances and competitions throughout the school year.

Description: Students continue the development of vocal production techniques and ensemble participation. Opportunities are provided for students to explore choral music as a means of expression and communication. Through the collaborative environment of the choral setting, students develop an understanding of teamwork and leadership skills. Students are provided with opportunities to participate in local, district, regional, and state events.

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Visual Arts Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Art 6

Grade 6
Elective Course

Description: Students will engage in activities designed to develop visual memory through observation. Art as a communication skill and means of personal expression will be explored. Skills in drawing and craftsmanship will be developed through the creation of artwork and the study of masterworks.

Art 7

Grade 7
Elective Course

Description: Students begin building skills in basic art medial while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design. The artwork of the masters will be studied with an emphasis on personal vision and expression of the individual. Students will explore the relationship among visual art, other art forms, and other subject areas.

Art 8

Grade 8
Elective Course

Description: Students continue to build skills in basic art medial while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design. The artwork of the masters will be studied with an emphasis on personal vision and expression of the individual. Students will explore the relationship among visual art, other art forms, and other subject areas.

Art 1 Foundations

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Requirement(s) – Students will work in several different art mediums including painting, drawing, and sculpture.

Description: The standards for Art I emphasize the development of the ability to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills needed to create, discuss, and understand original works of art.

Art 2 Intermediate

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: A grade of a C or higher in Art Foundations.

Requirement(s) – Students will continue work in several different art mediums including painting, drawing, crafts and sculpture.

Descriptions: Intermediate Art students examine the importance of content, concepts, and skills involved in the creation of original works of art and design.

Art 3 Advanced Intermediate

Grade 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: A grade of a B or higher in Intermediate Art.
Requirement(s) – Students will begin to focus on examining realistic painting and drawings. They will also have the opportunity to work with the instructor to work on their own
ideas.  Students will have a weekly art history quiz and deadlines for completing work.

Descriptions: Students increasingly focus on art history, critical evaluation, and aesthetics as well as creative problem solving. Study at this level affords students the opportunity to develop personal directions in the production of their works of art or to further their academic study in the visual arts.

Art 4 Advanced

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: A grade of a B or higher in Art 3 along with teacher recommendation.
Requirement(s) – Students will work with the instructor to work on their own ideas. Students will continue to explore selling their artwork. Students will have a weekly art history quiz and deadlines for completing work. Students must come in to the class with an idea of work they would like to explore.

Descriptions: The student-directed approach at this level richly enhances personal expressive abilities. An advanced level of performance that reflects critical and independent thinking and innovation is expected.

Art 5  Portfolio Preparation

Grade 12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: A grade of a B or higher in Art 4 along with teacher recommendation.
Requirement(s) – Students will work with the instructor to work on their own ideas. Students will focus on putting together a portfolio of their work. Students will have a weekly art history quiz and deadlines for completing work.

Descriptions: Students at this level are continuing their own work while focusing on their own style of artwork. Acceptance to art school or a business selling original artwork becomes the focus of this semester.

Graphic Art Design 1

Grade 12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: A grade of a B or higher in Art 1 and 2 or by teacher recommendation if only Art 1. Students must be a senior unless they have instructor permission.
Requirements: Students will have weekly deadlines for work.

Descriptions: Students learn the basics of Graphic Design focusing on drawing, letter design and using Photoshop to create images. Graphic Design students work to achieve perfection in their designs.

Computer Art Graphics

Grades: 9-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Art 1 with C or higher
Requirement(s) – Student must be able to use technology, have school internet/technology privileges, be able to work effectively in groups.

Descriptions: The student will use technology to create and manipulate images. The student will develop skill, confidence, and craftsmanship in the use of digital media, techniques, and processes to achieve desired intentions in works of art. Students will also demonstrate the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design in their work. Students will be graded on expected criteria for each unit, quizzes on each unit as well as quizzes on use of our digital imaging program, Photoshop Elements.

Ceramics

Grade: 11-12 or teacher recommendation
Prerequisite: Art 1 with C or higher

Description: Students will learn pottery making techniques and create various ceramic projects.

AP Art History **

Note: Currently this is offered online through Virtual Virginia.

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course

Description: The Advanced Placement offering in Art History is designed to provide the student with an understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. While visual analysis is the fundamental tool of the art historian, art history also emphasizes understanding works in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions of and effects of works of art. Student work will be required outside of class time.

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Health and Physical Education Courses

Health and Physical Education 6

Grade 6
Required Course

Description: Students will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness. Emphasis is placed on students learning basic skills and acquiring competence and confidence necessary to participate in and enjoy physical activity. Students are provided with learning experiences that help them acquire current health information and practice essential skills for making healthy decisions.

Health and Physical Education 7

Grade 7
Required Course

Description: Students will experience a developmentally designed program of skill and fitness. Emphasis is placed on students learning basic skills and acquiring competence and confidence necessary to participate in and enjoy physical activity. Students are provided with learning experiences that help them acquire current health information and practice essential skills for making healthy decisions.

Health and Physical Education 8

Grade 8
Elective Course

Description: Health and Physical Education 8 envisions the promotion of each student’s wellness for the 21st Century. Our course guidelines meet the standards set forth by NASPE. Students will receive a comprehensive program which prepares them to actively and effectively achieve and promote lifelong wellness. The curriculum will incorporate 5 strands of Life Long Wellness which will include: Functions and Interrelationship systems, Health Maintenance, Risk Assessment and Reduction, Efficiency of Human Movement and Performance, Physical Activity and Lifetime Wellness.

Students will also take part in the National Campaign “Hoops/Jump Rope 4 Heart” program. To ensure the success of these strands, we have incorporated the use of the “Too Good For Drugs” program and “Life Skills Training”.

Health and Physical Education 9

Grade 9
Required Course
Note: First Aid, CPR, AED Training is taught in this course  as graduation requirement

Description: This course is designed for students to apply a variety of health concepts, skills, and behaviors when making health-related decisions. The health education content focuses on nutrition, fitness, substance prevention, first aid, CPR, AED training, and family life education. In physical education emphasis is placed on students becoming confident and competent in performing lifetime physical activities. Fitness experiences and individual fitness assessments are integrated throughout the year. Physical Education activities include physical fitness, outdoor education, individual and dual sports, rhythmics, basketball, softball, volleyball, field hockey, soccer, speedball, tennis, bowling, golf and action games.

Health and Driver Education

Grade: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: Health and Physical Education 9

Note: Student should have Learner’s Permit prior or obtain during the semester they are enrolled in this course, if possible.

Description: The classroom and in-car driver education standards focus on safe driving attitudes; time, space, and distance-perception skill development; and the recognition of and appropriate response to hazards in the ever-changing driving environment. Emphasis is placed on linking visual search skills, space management, and maintenance of balanced vehicle control to risk-reducing driving strategies. Significant attention is given to risk awareness, driver alertness, driver distractions, the social and economic consequences of driving, occupant protection, positive interactions with other roadway users, and the physical and psychological conditions that affect driver performance. Students apply basic driving skills in low-to-moderate traffic environments and progress to demonstration of skill proficiency in more complex traffic situations. When possible, teachers are also encouraged to use simulation and other technologies that will enhance student learning.

Goals
The purpose of driver education is to provide students with a detailed understanding of the fundamentals of driving and to foster responsible attitudes and behaviors. As a result of quality traffic-safety instruction, students will be able to

  • demonstrate a working knowledge of the laws governing the operation of a motor vehicle
  • identify and analyze the physical and psychological conditions that affect driver performance
  • apply knowledge, processes, and skills to become safe, competent users of the highway transportation system
  • use visual search skills to make risk-reducing decisions by adjusting speed and/or position
  • demonstrate balanced vehicle movement through precise and timely steering, braking, and accelerating under a variety of conditions
  • display responsible driving behaviors when alone and with peers

Team Sports

Grade: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: HPE 9 with a C or higher or teacher recommendation

Description: Physical Education activities include physical fitness, leisure sports, individual and dual sports, officiating and game strategies of team sports, rhythmics and dance, directing tournament brackets and managing tournament play, including weight training, and emphasizing career opportunities.

Recreation Sports

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: HPE 9 with a C or higher or teacher recommendation

Description: This elective course stresses participation in a variety of lifetime activities, designed for students to develop and maintain lifetime skills focused on strength training and conditioning. The course includes recreational activities, fitness activities, and individual, dual, and team sports. Possible activities are aerobics and aerobic games, badminton, volleyball, tennis, frisbee golf, canoeing, cycling, golf, hiking, fishing, archery, swimming/water safety, strength training, and cardiovascular endurance/training. This class emphasis is placed on students becoming confident and competent in performing lifetime physical activities. Fitness experiences and individual fitness assessments are integrated throughout the year. Class also emphasis is placed on student self- managing their programs.

Introduction to Weight Lifting

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: HPE 9 with a B or higher or teacher recommendation

Description: Students are introduced and instructed in basic techniques of weightlifting and all components of fitness.  The emphasis of the course is total body strength training with all students having a personal workout plan. Athletes taking the course will be on a specific workout plan provided by their coach to prepare for their season.  Pre-tests, mid-term tests, and post-tests are administered to track student progress. This course is recommended for students with a sincere commitment to fitness.

Intermediate & Advanced Weight Lifting

Grades: 11-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: HPE 9 and Intro to Weight Lifting with a B or higher or teacher recommendation

Description: Intermediate Weight Lifting:

Students are instructed in advance techniques of weightlifting and all components of fitness, and will assist Weight Training I students in the class with techniques and concepts.  The emphasis of the course is total body strength training with all students having a personal workout plan. Students will have specific goals for themselves and will have a plan to reach those goals.  Athletes taking the course will be on a specific workout plan provided by their coach to prepare for their season. Pre-tests, mid-term tests, and post-tests are administered to track student progress. This course is recommended for students with a sincere commitment to fitness.

Description: Advanced Weight Lifting

This course is designed for students with a unique interest in weightlifting and athletics.  Students will serve as a personal trainer to Weight Training I/II students in the class while also completing an advanced workout designed to reach their advanced personal goals.  Athletes taking the course will be on a specific workout plan provided by their coach to prepare for their season or will be on a college-level workout plan to prepare for college athletics.  Pre-tests, mid-term tests, and post-tests are administered to track student progress. Students will be assisting in administering the tests to the beginning students. This course is recommended for students with an interest of pursuing a fitness-related career.

Sports, Exercise, and Health Science

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course
Prerequisite: HPE 9 with C or higher

Description: Physical activities will include developing and maintaining an active lifestyle through participating in functional fitness training sessions.   These sessions focus on strength training, conditioning, flexibility, agility exercises, muscle and cardio-respiratory endurance, stress management, exercise and aging, exercise related injury and learning to stay fit for a lifetime.  Health topics will include nutrition, weight management training, and cancer risks, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual and environmental aspects. Students will focus on daily physical activities and exercises along with proper nutrition.  Students will set individual goals for weight loss or gain, and design personal diet and menus for developing sound nutritional habits.

Weight Training for Athletes I-IV

Grades: 10-12
Elective Course

Description: This course is designed for student athletes to build core strength and target the needs of the individual to help them excel in their specific sport.

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Support and Enrichment Courses

Career Investigations – Required CTE Course

Grade Level: 7
Length of Course: 9 weeks
Prerequisite: none

Required for all 7th grade students to develop Academic and Career Plan of Study

Description: This course prepares students to be “career investigators.” To obtain the title, students must assess their roles in society, identify their roles as workers, analyze their personal assets, complete a basic exploration of career clusters, select career fields or occupations for further study, and create a plan based on the their academic and career interests.

Read 180 (DMS)

Grades: 6-8
Elective Course

Description: This course is designed to support students to strengthen their reading skills in a small group setting. Students rotate through interactive stations and receive prescriptive support through this program.

System 44 (DMS)

Grades: 6-8
Elective Course

Description: This course is designed to support students to strengthen their reading skills in a small group setting. Students rotate through interactive stations and receive prescriptive support through this program.

English as a Second Language

Grades 6-12
Required Elective for students needing additional support.

Individual Student Alternative Education Plan (ISAEP)

Grades: 9-12

*Students must be recommended and attend eligibility meeting prior to enrolling.

The Individual Student Alternative Education Plan (ISAEP) program is designed for those students ages 16 to 18 and enrolled in high school programs who are having difficulty finding success in a regular classroom environment. ISAEP programs are located in school divisions and funded through a combination of state grants and local funds.

Enrollment Requirements:

  1. Initial Principal-Parent Student (PPS) meeting
  2. Student evaluation and/or assessment
  3. 7.5 grade equivalent or higher on a recognized standardized measure of reading achievement
  4. Achieve a passing score on each of the subtests of the GED Ready Official Practice Test.

Completion Requirements:

  1. Passing the GED test
  2. Successful completion of the career and technical component.
  3. Complete an Economics and Personal Finance course

Discovery English I & II

Grades 9-12
Elective Course

Description: This course is designed to support students to strengthen their reading skills in a small group setting. Students rotate through interactive stations and receive prescriptive support through this program.

Economics and Personal Finance – Required Course for Graduation 

Course Length: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 11
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students learn how economies and markets operate and how the United States economy is interconnected with the global economy. Additionally they learn how to navigate the financial decisions they must face and to make informed decisions relating to career exploration, budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, financing postsecondary education, taxes, saving and investing, buying/leasing a vehicle, and living independently. They also learn the importance of investing in themselves in order to gain the knowledge and skills valued in the marketplace. Development of financial literacy skills and an understanding of economic principles will provide the basis for responsible citizenship, more effective participation in the workforce, and career success. The course incorporates all economics and financial literacy objectives included in the Code of Virginia §22.1-200-03B.

Discovery Math

Grades: 9-11
Prerequisite: none

Description: This would be a co-taught class with mathematics and exceptional education teacher that is designed to build foundational skills necessary to be successful in Algebra I.

SAT/ACT Preparation

Study Skills – Writing

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Business and Information Technology Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Keyboarding

Length of course: 6-9 weeks
Grade Level: 6-8
Prerequisite: none

Required for students typing under 25 wpm

Description: This course is designed for middle school students to develop and enhance touch skills for entering alphabetic, numeric, and symbol information on a keyboard. Students compose and produce personal, educational, and professional documents.

Make It Your Business

Length of Course: 9 or 18 weeks
Grades: 6-8

Description: Students design, establish, and operate a small group or class business, producing a service or product that meets an identified school or community need. Emphasis is placed on the introduction and application of business terminology, basic entrepreneurship concepts, and fundamental business principles. Basic academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) are integrated into this course.

Computer Solutions

Grade Level: 6-8
Length of Course: 9 or 18 weeks
Prerequisite: Keyboarding or typing above 25wpm

Description: Students are introduced to the world of business using the computer as a problem-solving tool. Emphasis is placed on using basic touch keyboarding skills to complete a variety of projects incorporating word processing, database, presentation, and spreadsheet software. Basic Internet safety and computer maintenance issues are important components of this course.

Digital Applications  ***

Prerequisite: Keyboarding or teacher approval – this course is Google based computer applications (CIS is Microsoft-based)

Grade Level: 8-10 (middle school students would earn a High School credit upon successful completion of the course).

Description: Students develop or review correct keyboarding techniques and gain a basic knowledge of word processing, spreadsheet, database, graphics, and telecommunications applications. Students demonstrate an understanding of computer concepts through application of knowledge. Students learn to use software packages and local and worldwide network communications systems. Grade 8 Computer/Technology Standards of Learning are incorporated and reinforced in this course.

Information Technology (IT) Fundamentals

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding or Digital Input Technology

Description: Information Technology (IT) Fundamentals introduces the essential technical and professional skills required for students to pursue programs leading to professional careers and IT certifications. Students investigate career opportunities and technologies in four major IT areas: Information Services and Support, Network Systems, Programming and Software Development, and Interactive Media. Students will evaluate the impact of IT on other career clusters. The focus of the IT Fundamentals course is the introduction of skills related to information technology basics, Internet fundamentals, network systems, computer maintenance/upgrading/troubleshooting, computer applications, programming, graphics, Web page design, and interactive media. Students explore ethical issues related to computers and Internet technology and develop teamwork and communication skills that will enhance their employability.

Business Law

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students examine the foundations of the American legal system and learn the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Students gain practical knowledge and life skills by exploring economic and social concepts related to laws governing business and individuals. Focus areas include contracts, consumer protection, criminal law, tort law, international law, family/domestic law, employment law, cyber law, and careers in the legal profession. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised on-the-job training in an approved position with continuing supervision throughout the school year.

Accounting

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding or teacher recommendation

Description: Accounting students study the basic principles, concepts, and practices of the accounting cycle for a service business and a merchandising business. Topics covered include analyzing transactions, journalizing and posting entries, preparing payroll records and financial statements, and managing cash control systems. Business ethics and professional conduct are emphasized. Students learn fundamental accounting procedures, using both manual and electronic systems.

Computer Information Systems (CIS)***

Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: Digital Input Technology, Computer Applications, or keyboarding

Description: Students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through word processing, spreadsheets, databases, multimedia presentations, and integrated software activities. Students work individually and in groups to explore computer concepts, operating systems, networks, telecommunications, and emerging technologies.

Entrepreneurship Education

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level 9-12
Prerequisites: none

Description: This course introduces students to the exciting world of creating, owning, and launching their own business. Students will learn concepts and techniques for planning an innovative business and living the entrepreneurial lifestyle.

Note: Entrepreneurship Education may be offered as a complement to an existing concentration sequence in any Career Cluster. In some instances, where noted, it may be combined with specific courses to create concentration sequences.

Programming

Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: I.T. Fundamentals

Description: Students in the Programming course explore programming concepts, use algorithmic procedures, implement programming procedures with one or more standard languages, and master programming fundamentals. Coding is used throughout the course. Graphical user interfaces may be used as students design and develop interactive multimedia applications, including game programs. In addition, students employ HTML or JavaScript to create Web pages. Students develop their employability skills through a variety of activities.

Health Infomatics

Grades: 10-12
Prereq: none

Description: Students will have the opportunity to explore the importance of safeguarding electronic healthcare information. Students will be introduced to the various technologies and trends that affect the healthcare industry. Health informatics is a rapidly growing field with a projected 21 percent increase in demand for workers throughout the state of Virginia from 2014-2024.* Students will explore aspects of health informatics to include the history of health information technology (IT) in the United States, the Electronic Health Record (EHR), ethical and privacy issues, and cybersecurity and data breaches.

Introduction to VA Teachers for Tomorrow

Grade: 9-10
Prerequisite: none

Description: This exploratory course fosters student interest, understanding, and appreciation of the teaching profession and allows students an introduction to careers in education. Students are taught to develop self-awareness, collaborate and communicate with peers, build positive learning environments, and discover learning differences of others. The curriculum is designed to help students set attainable goals in the Education and Training Career Cluster. This course introduces students to the high school Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow (VTfT) program. Additional educational leadership opportunities are offered through the student organization, Educators Rising.

Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow I  *
Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow II  *

Course Length: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 11-12
Prerequisite: none

Description: Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow (VTfT) fosters student interest, understanding, and appreciation of the teaching profession and allows secondary students to explore careers in education. Students build a foundation for teaching; learn the history, structure and governance of teaching; apply professional teaching techniques in the VTfT classroom and field experience; and reflect on their teaching experiences. Additional educational leadership opportunities are offered through the student organization, Educators Rising.

Note: Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow I may be offered as a complement to an existing concentration sequence in any Career Cluster. In some instances, where noted, it may be combined with specific courses to create concentration sequences.

AP Computer Science Principles **

Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 with C or higher and interest in programming and computer science/engineering field

Description:  Learn the principles that underlie the science of computing and develop the thinking skills that computer scientists use. You’ll work on your own and as part of a team to creatively address real-world issues using the tools and processes of computation.

Office Specialist I-III

Grade: 9-12
Pre-req: none

Note: This course is for students seeking an applied studies diploma.

Description: Students complete the Office Specialist sequence identified locally or progress in the sequence until prepared to transfer into other business courses. Students develop skills in areas including keyboarding, word processing, office procedures, and records management. If a fourth year is needed, the teacher should use simulated activities in the following areas: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, telecommunications, graphic design, and records management.

Database Design and Management

Grades:
Pre-req: Programming or AP Computer Science

Medical Coding and Billing

Grade: 11-12
Prereq: Health Infomatics

Description: Students will be introduced to healthcare systems, how to manage an office, and the electronic medical record as it pertains to the field of medical coding and billing. Students will be exposed to the medical terminology used to describe human anatomy and physiology. Students will also be introduced to the field of health informatics.

Cybersecurity Fundamentals

Grades: 9-12

Description: Cybersecurity affects every individual, organization, and nation. This course focuses on the evolving and all-pervasive technological environment with an emphasis on securing personal, organizational, and national information. Students will be introduced to the principles of cybersecurity, explore emerging technologies, examine threats and protective measures, and investigate the diverse high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand career opportunities in the field of cybersecurity.

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Health and Medical Science Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Medical Laboratory Technology I

Grade: 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology II – Anatomy

Description: In Medical Laboratory Technology I, students gain foundational knowledge and skills appropriate for a variety of medical-related career paths in the field of medical technology. They are introduced to diagnostic and therapeutic laboratory procedures that support medical research and practice, and investigate safety, quality assurance, and ethical concerns associated with the field of medical technology.

Medical Laboratory Technology II

Grade: 11-12
Prerequisite: Medical Lab Tech I

Description: Students will build on the foundational knowledge and skills obtained in Medical Laboratory Technology I. The students will use the basic principles necessary to perform competently in the areas of Hematology, Clinical Chemistry, Clinical Microbiology, Immunohematology, and Immunology/Serology. Competency includes performing the technique correctly, understanding the theory of the procedures, and interpreting the results. Weekly laboratory activities will stress actual student performance of the routine tests normally seen in the clinical setting.

Introduction to Health and Medical Science

Grades: 9-12
Prereq: none

Description: This course introduces the student to a variety of healthcare careers and develops basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. It is designed to help students understand the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system and to learn basic healthcare terminology, anatomy and physiology for each body system, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of traumatic and medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instruction emphasizes safety, cleanliness, asepsis, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency within the healthcare environment. Students also begin gaining job-seeking skills for entry into the health and medical sciences field. In addition, instruction may include the basics of medical laboratory procedures, pharmacology fundamentals, biotechnology concepts, and communication skills essential for providing quality patient care.

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Military Science (JROTC) Courses

***The ASVAB is a multiple-aptitude battery that measures developed abilities and helps predict future academic and occupational success in the military.  ASVAB scores are used primarily to determine enlistment eligibility, assign applicants to military jobs, and to aid students in career exploration.  The “Overall” ASVAB Score is known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test Score (AFQT).  Additionally, students who are enrolled in a Military Science course and earn a passing score on the ASVAB exam may use this industry certification to satisfy the graduation requirement for the Standard Diploma.  

ASVAB Cut Scores
Military Branch AFQT Cut Score
Army 31

Army JROTC I

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: none

Description:Students are introduced to the JROTC curriculum, and basic U.S. citizenship rights and responsibilities are established and reinforced. Students learn leadership, history, communication techniques, disciplined study habits, management skills, first aid, drug abuse prevention, map reading, physical fitness, and workplace readiness skills. Military customs and courtesies, proper uniform wear, and personal appearance guidelines are followed within the leadership lab, drill, and military ceremonies

Army JROTC II

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Military Science I

Description: Students are introduced to the JROTC curriculum, and basic U.S. citizenship rights and responsibilities are established and reinforced. Students learn leadership, history, communication techniques, disciplined study habits, management skills, first aid, drug abuse prevention, map reading, physical fitness, and workplace readiness skills. Military customs and courtesies, proper uniform wear, and personal appearance guidelines are followed within the leadership lab, drill, and military ceremonies.

Army JROTC III

Grade Level: 10-12

Prerequisite: Military Science II

Description: Students continue to develop their leadership skills through working as command and staff leaders. Additional communication skills are developed, including methods of instruction, preparation, and proper conduct of cadet-led classes. Human relations, group dynamics, orienteering, contemporary U. S. issues, and advanced military history studies are also included.

Army JROTC IV

Grade Level: 11-12

Prerequisite: Military Science IV

Description: Students continue to develop their leadership skills through working as command and staff leaders. Additional communication skills are developed, including methods of instruction, preparation, and proper conduct of cadet-led classes. Human relations, group dynamics, orienteering, contemporary U. S. issues, and advanced military history studies are also included.

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Agricultural Education Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Introduction to Agriscience

Length of course: 9 weeks
Grade Level: 6
Prerequisite: none

Description: Middle school students develop an awareness of the relationships between agriculture and science. Major concepts covered in the course include awareness of agriculture, the world of work, agribusiness careers, human relations, and scientific principles applied in agriculture.

Agriscience Exploration

Length of course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 7
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students explore science as it relates to agriculture and develop an understanding of human relations, communication, the importance of agriculture to the economy, and key scientific terms related to the field of agriculture.

Agriscience Exploration

Length of course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 8
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students explore science as it relates to agriculture and develop an understanding of human relations, communication, the importance of agriculture to the economy, and key scientific terms related to the field of agriculture.

Introduction to Animal Systems ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10 – 11
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students develop competencies in each of the major areas of the Animal Systems career pathway including animal nutrition, reproduction, breeding, care, and management. Students learn agricultural mechanics applicable to animal systems. As with all agriculture courses, students will be exposed to principles of leadership and opportunities within student organizations along with Supervised Agricultural Experience opportunities.

Introduction to Plant Systems ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-11
Prerequisite: none

Description: Students develop competencies in each of the major areas of the Plant Systems career pathway, including applied botany, plant propagation, and plant care and selection. Instructional content also includes an introduction to the various divisions of the plant systems industry. Students learn agricultural mechanics applicable to plant systems. As with all agriculture courses, students will be exposed to the principles of leadership and opportunities within student organizations, along with Supervised Agricultural Experience opportunities.

Introduction to Power, Structural, and Technical Systems ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level 10 -11

Description: Throughout this introductory level Agricultural Power course, students will receive instruction in the areas of basic engine principles, power trains, hydraulics, and electrical systems. The course will also address the areas of building structures, metal fabrication, and precision agricultural management.

Agricultural Power Systems ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level 10-12
Prerequisite: Intro to Power, Structural and Technical Systems

Description: Instruction in agricultural power systems will focus on increasing the depth of study in power and technical systems. Areas of these systems to be addressed are engines, powertrains, hydraulics, electrical, and fuels. Instruction will also be provided in precision measurement, leadership, and career skills.

Horticulture Science ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Intro to Plant Systems or Biology

Description: Through laboratory activities, students apply scientific principles to the field of horticulture, including the areas of floriculture, landscape design, greenhouse operation, nursery plant production, and turf management. They practice safety, develop leadership traits, use plant-growing media, and identify, propagate, and grow horticultural plants in the greenhouse and land laboratory.

Small Animal Care ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Intro to Animal Systems OR Biology with a C or higher

Description: Students learn how to care for and manage small animals, focusing on instructional areas in animal health, nutrition, management, reproduction, and evaluation. Course content also includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for small animal care, and provides activities to foster leadership development. FFA and SAE activities are encouraged.

Veterinary Science I ***

Length of Course: 18 weeks
Grade Level 11-12
Prerequisite: Biology AND Small Animal Care or Equine Management

Description:Veterinary Science enables students to acquire the employability and technical knowledge and skills needed to succeed in postsecondary education as well as in a career in veterinary medicine or a related occupation. Course content integrates application of academics, development of career competencies, and instruction in course-specific knowledge and skills, such as the use of tools, equipment, and facilities related to veterinary medicine. Business management, leadership, and FFA activities are included in the course. Students enrolled in the course should have a strong background in math and science and should be familiar with small animal care.

Livestock Production and Equine Management ***

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Animal Systems

Description: Students will study on large animal production and care to include cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and horses. Emphasis is placed on animal health, nutrition, management, reproduction, training, evaluation, and showmanship. Additional instruction in tools, equipment, facilities management, business management of equine enterprises, and the economics of livestock ownership. Participation in FFA activities, leadership development events (LDEs), and career development events (CDEs) is encouraged.

Applied Agricultural Concepts ***

Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Intro to Power, Intro to Plant, Intro to Animal

Description: This course is a capstone project course designed for students with previous agriculture experience.
Students gain positive experiences through fundamental agricultural competencies needed for rural or urban living. Areas of instruction include food production, handling, and preparation; introduction to the livestock and poultry industry; soil, soil fertility, and cultural practices; mechanical applications; plant systems and disease/pest management for shrubs, lawns, pastures, gardens, and fruit trees. The course emphasizes leadership development and participation in FFA activities. Supervised Agricultural Experiences will allow for enhanced learning and growth opportunities for students. Electrical, plumbing, carpentry, and metalworking lab competencies are incorporated throughout the course.

Foundations of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Grades: 9
Prerequisite: none

Description: This is an introduction to all agriculture pathways including animals, plants and power systems.

Agriculture Education – Preparation

Grade: 9-12
Prerequisite: none

Note: This course is for students seeking an applied studies diploma.

Description: This course covers a wide variety of information about agriculture and related fields. The intent is to enable the instructor to customize instruction to meet the needs of the student enrolled in the agricultural education program. Content areas include agribusiness operations, animal science and care, ecology and natural resource management, plant science and landscaping, and woodworking and basic mechanics. Instructors should select the content areas that will prepare students for the pathways offered in the school. Competencies in this course should be included in an SAE.

Turfgrass Management

Grades 10-12
Prerequisites: Introduction to Plant Systems

Description: Students begin to master the duties and tasks of professionals who establish and maintain turf in public areas such as golf courses; parks; athletic fields; school, industrial, and institutional campuses; and residential lawns.

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Marketing Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Fashion Design

Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Marketing

Description: This course leads students into the exciting and ever-changing world of fashion. Students gain knowledge of marketing as it relates to the fashion industry. From brick-and-mortar retail establishments to online retail and social media marketing, students will explore aspects such as trends, technology, the buying process, visual merchandising, the nature and history of fashion and fashion designers, and the global impact of the fashion industry on the economy.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing ***

Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Marketing

Description: This introductory course helps students develop a thorough understanding of fundamental marketing concepts and theories as they relate to the sports and entertainment industries. Students will investigate the components of customer service skills, branding, product development, pricing and distribution strategies, business structures, sales processes, social media, sponsorships and endorsements, as well as promotion plans needed for sports and entertainment events. The course also supports career development skills and explores career options. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course.

Marketing

Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: none
Note: This is replacing Intro to Marketing in the sequence and will be the first course for Marketing students.

Students examine activities in marketing and business important for success in marketing employment and postsecondary education. Students will learn how products are developed, branded, and sold to businesses and consumers. Students will analyze industry trends and gain hands-on experience in the marketing of goods, services, and ideas. Topics will include professionalism in the workplace, product planning and positioning, promotion, pricing, selling, economic issues, and the impact of technology on the marketplace. Computer/technology applications and DECA activities enhance the course. DECA, the co-curricular student organization, offers opportunities in leadership, community, and competitive events.

Marketing Management ***

Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Marketing + 2nd Marketing course

Description: This course is designed for high school seniors who plan to attend college with a concentration in marketing, business, or management and/or who have plans to manage or own a business. Students will be exposed to all aspects of marketing and management. These skills will translate to small and large businesses, nonprofit organizations, service industries, and government agencies.

Real Estate ***

Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Marketing and/or Entrepreneurship

Students learn to apply real estate principles such as sales, real estate financing, ownership rights, investments, ethics, and laws. This course also meets the Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation’s (DPOR’s) required 60 class/clock hours of real estate salesperson pre-license education. Upon successful completion of the course students are eligible to take the Virginia real estate salesperson licensing exam.* Correspondence with the Virginia Department of Education’s marketing specialist will be required to obtain a letter of approval from the Real Estate Board to submit with the testing application. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course. Students use computer/technology applications in support of course objectives. Work-based learning opportunities are suggested for this course.

*Individuals must be 18 years of age and have a high school diploma before applying for licensure as a real estate salesperson in Virginia.

Additionally, those interested in pursuing licensure should be aware of the costs involved (e.g., application fee, testing fee, continuing education fees). Refer to DPOR regulations for current information. Further details are provided in the Related Material section of this course.

Digital and Social Media Marketing

Grades: 10-12
Prereq: Introduction to Marketing

Description: This course introduces students to digital and social media marketing. Students explore principles, strategies, tools, and tactics related to consumers, branding, advertising, and promotions. Students explore how success is measured in a digital and social media marketing campaign. This course emphasizes ethics, laws, and security. Students also investigate business and marketing plans as well as careers in digital and social media marketing.

Marketing School Store Manager (School Based Enterprise WBL) ***

Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Marketing Management

CTE Certification Offered:  Customer Service Certification

Description:  Students engage in a hands-on learning opportunity operating the school store and learn about:

Cost & Profit
Customer Service by waiting on customers
Money exchange
Order and Check in merchandise procedures
Importance of advertising
Accounting by working on real records

Students are encouraged to participate in the student organization DECA (An Association of Marketing Students).  For more information on DECA go to http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/career_technical/ctso/index.shtml or see the CTE Teacher.

Travel & Tourism Marketing

Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Marketing + 2nd Marketing course

Description: This course examines the components of the travel and tourism industry, including attractions, lodging, transportation, and food and beverage. Other topics include the history, political, social, and cultural effects of travel and tourism on local, state, and global environments. Students develop competencies in the areas of communication, customer service, marketing, industry technology, economics, and management functions, and are provided with opportunities for hands-on, real-world applications. Applying academic skills is also part of this course.

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Family and Consumer Science Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Introduction to Culinary Arts

Grades: 10-11

Description: The Introduction to Culinary Arts curriculum provides students with opportunities to explore career options and entrepreneurial opportunities within the food service industry. Students investigate food safety and sanitation, explore culinary preparation foundations, practice basic culinary skills, explore diverse cuisines and service styles, investigate nutrition and menu development, and examine the economics of food. The curriculum places a strong emphasis on science and mathematics knowledge and skills.

Culinary Arts I ***

Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Culinary Arts

Note: This course is 280 hours, which is 1 block for an entire school year.

Description: The Culinary Arts I curriculum provides students with the foundations for a comprehensive knowledge of the food service industry and with opportunities to build technical skills. Students examine and practice basic rules and procedures related to kitchen and food safety, kitchen sanitation procedures, and emergency measures. Students explore the purchasing and receiving of goods and study fundamental nutritional principles and guidelines. As they explore food-preparation techniques, students practice applying these techniques to the preparation and serving of basic food products. The curriculum places a strong emphasis on science and mathematics knowledge and skills.

Culinary Arts II ***

Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I

Note: This course is 280 hours, which is 1 block for an entire school year.

Description: The Culinary Arts II curriculum provides students with continuing opportunities to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the food service industry as well as to expand their technical skills. Students practice kitchen safety and sanitation, apply nutritional principles to food preparation and storage, perform a wide range of more advanced food-preparation techniques including garde manger and baking, refine their dining room serving skills, develop menus, perform on-site and off-site catered functions, and strengthen their business and math skills. The curriculum continues to place a strong emphasis on science and mathematics knowledge and skills

Baking and Pastry Specialization

Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: Culinary I

Description: The Culinary Arts Specialization course provides students with skills and knowledge to pursue careers in the food service industry. In a hands-on environment, students apply nutritional principles, plan menus, use business and mathematics skills, select and maintain food service equipment, and adhere to safety and sanitation standards

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Technology Education Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Technical Drawing and Design ***

Grade Level: 9-12

Description: In this foundation course, students learn the basic language of technical design, while they design, sketch, and make technical drawings, illustrations, models, or prototypes of real design problems. Students develop spatial ability as they apply mathematical concepts to visual representations. The course is especially recommended for future engineering and architecture students.

Engineering Drawing and Design ***

Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing and Design

Description: Students explore the engineering design process and use a graphic language for product design, technical illustration, assembly, patent, and structural drawings. They increase their understanding of drawing and the design process and techniques learned in the prerequisite course. Students use computers, calculators, and descriptive geometry and adhere to established standards to solve design problems.

Architectural Drawing and Design ***

Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing and Design

Description: Students explore architectural design foundations and increase understanding of working drawings, construction techniques, and codes regulating building design. They learn the design process and apply the elements and principles of design to architectural projects. Through producing models and illustrations of all aspects of a building, students create architectural design solutions using CADD (computer aided drafting and design).

Energy and Power ***

Grade: 10-12
Prerequisite: Sustainability and Renewable Technologies

Description: In this course, students analyze energy sources and explore the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity. The course provides math, science, and technical writing skills through hands-on application. Students have an opportunity to take the Energy Industry Fundamentals Certificate Assessment (must complete the course and earn a 68% on the final assessment). The bearer of the Energy Industry Fundamentals Certificate has a foundational knowledge and understanding of the utility industry.

Sustainability and Renewable Technologies ***

Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: none

Description: Sustainable and Renewable Technologies explores issues that affect global citizens in the areas of economics, culture, and the environment. The course introduces students to the historic, economic, political, environmental, and cultural issues that impact the global community and its’ future. Students will address issues affecting the health of our environment and explore solutions offered by sustainable agriculture, energy efficient building design, and renewable energy sources.

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Trade and Industrial Education Courses

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
** – AP Courses offered – College credit dependent on AP test results
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Building Trades I

Grades: 9 -11
Prerequisite: none

Description: Building Trades I introduces students to skills in the four core areas of residential construction: masonry, carpentry, electricity, and plumbing. Students emphasize safety by preparing to earn the OSHA 10 card as they build or repair entire residential structures, using a variety of materials and tools.

Building Trades II ***

Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Building Trades I

Description: Building Trades II teaches students advanced skills in masonry, carpentry, electricity, and plumbing. The class prepares students to synthesize these valuables skills to build or repair complete residential structures, using a variety of materials and tools.

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CTE Courses at Rowanty Technical Center

* – Dual Enrollment Courses through John Tyler Community College
***  – CTE Certification applies to this course to earn a verified unit of credit for high school courses.

Nurse Aide I & II

Grade Level: 11-12

Descriptions:
Nurse Aide I, offered as an occupational preparation course beginning at the 11th-grade level, emphasizes the study of nursing occupations as related to the health care system. Students study normal growth and development, simple body structure and function, and medical terminology and are introduced to microbes and disease. They receive elementary skill training in patient-nursing assistant relationships; taking and recording of vital signs; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and bathing, feeding, dressing, and transporting of patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Limited on-the-job instruction in nursing homes and hospitals is part of the course. This course can be used as an introduction to practical nursing or to prepare the student for Nurse Aide II so that all competencies for a certified nursing assistant are met.

Recommended prerequisite(s): Introduction to Health and Medical Sciences 8302

Nurse Aide II is an occupational preparation course, emphasizing advanced skill training in areas such as catheter care, range of motion, bowel and bladder training, care of the dying, selected procedures for maternal and infant care, and admission and discharge procedures. Students learn diseases and body systems as related to advanced clinical care of the acute medical-surgical patient, the chronically ill, and the elderly. On-the-job instruction in a licensed nursing home is part of the course. Upon completion of the nurse aide program, the student is eligible to take the nurse aide certification exam that leads to employment as a certified nurse aide in hospitals and nursing homes.

Commonwealth of Virginia
Regulations Governing Certified Nurse Aides

Virginia Board of Nursing
www.dhp.virginia.gov/nursing/leg/CNA_02272014.doc

Automotive Technology I & II

Grade Level: 11-12

Auto Tech I Description: Due to recent technological advancements in automobiles, it is crucial that technicians are prepared with state-of-the-art technology and training. This course represents a large sampling of the competencies from National Automotive Technician’s Education Foundation’s CNATEF’s) Maintenance and Light Repair accredited program. Students are provided instruction in all systems as they prepare for the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Student Certification, “the first step in building a career as a service professional in the automotive industry.”

Auto Tech II Description: This course represents the advanced competencies from National Automotive Technician’s Education Foundation’s (CNATEF’s) Maintenance and Light Repair accredited program without redundancy from the prerequisite course. Students are provided instruction in all systems as they prepare for the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Student Certification, “the first step in building a career as a service professional in the automotive industry.” Successful completion of this course will result in program completion and prepare students to pass the equivalent NATEF student exam and ultimately attain certification.

Masonry I & II

Grades 11-12

Masonry I Description: Students develop the basic skills to use both hand and power tools, as well as machinery and equipment, related to brick and block masonry construction. Students focus on problem-solving and employability skills while performing entry-level brick masonry tasks.

Masonry II Description: Students further refine and expand their skills in the use of hand and power tools, as well as machinery and equipment, to construct masonry wall systems typical of the 21st century. Students may have the opportunity to experience work-based learning.

Cosmetology I & II

Grade Level: 11-12

Cosmetology I Description: In this introductory course, students study hair, skin, and nails and their related care. Students are grounded in theory as they prepare to practice procedures in a clinical lab setting or classroom, using manikins for manipulative skill practice. The first-year course emphasizes personal safety, professionalism, and sanitation and disinfection of equipment and facilities. Students develop skills in shampooing and conditioning hair, as well as styling and cutting hair. They are introduced to chemical texture services and develop skills in manicure and pedicure procedures.

Cosmetology II Description: In this continuing course, students build on their theoretical foundation of general sciences and practices in cosmetology to increase proficiency in hair cutting and styling on live models, with attention to professionalism, client consultation, safety, and infection control. Students are trained in safe chemical processes related to permanent waves, relaxers, lightening, and coloring hair. In addition, students learn to care for skin, hands, and feet, developing experience in providing facials, manicures, pedicures, and nail enhancements. Students will be introduced to a business management unit with a focus on managing the salon.

Carpentry I & II

Grade Level: 11-12

Carpentry I is the building block for achieving high-level construction industry skills that can result in an exciting and lucrative career. With an emphasis on safety, students are taught to use hand and power tools, cut stock, apply construction mathematics, and interpret blueprints. Students will become proficient in identifying types of residential construction components to form foundations and frame walls, floors, ceilings, roofs, doors, and windows. All students will obtain the required OSHA 10 safety credential.

Carpentry II leads to successful transition into postsecondary education for careers in carpentry and related fields, such as construction management, architecture, and others. Students are taught the safe use of hand and power tools common to the industry to complement their OSHA 10 safety credential earned in Carpentry I. Students will become proficient in assembling and installing various types of residential construction components that are current with industry standards, including rigging and job-estimating procedures, forming foundations, framing floors, walls, ceiling, roofs, trusses, roofing materials, stairs, exterior doors and windows, decks, and porches. Successfully passing this course leads to CTE program completion.

Welding I & II

Grade Level 11-12

Welding I Description: Welding is required by a wide variety of industries—anywhere fusible materials and high heat are needed to manufacture, repair, or alter tools and products. Professional welders are in high demand and can earn accordingly. Students in Welding I are taught to use manual welding, cutting, and electrical arc welding processes to fabricate and join metal parts according to diagrams, blueprints, and specifications. Students will also learn all safety-related practices and techniques, including earning the OSHA 10 card.

Welding II Description: This course teaches advanced welding students how to fine-tune their craft and to perform welds in various positions, using multiple welding processes. Students prepare to pass relevant industry certifications. Welding is required by a wide variety of industries—anywhere fusible materials and high heat are needed to manufacture, repair, or alter products. Professional welders are in high-demand and can earn accordingly.

This welding capstone course teaches the industry’s emerging technologies and how to demonstrate gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) pipe tests. Students are prepared to earn relevant industry credentials toward employment in production or manufacturing facilities.

Auto Body Technology I & II

Grade Level 11-12

Auto Body I Description: In the global automotive repair industry, there is a growing demand for qualified auto body technicians. In this course, students are taught non-structural analysis, damage repair, and welding. Students work with a variety of materials, using metal finishing and body filling techniques to prepare surfaces and repair panels. In addition, students practice shop safety and gain career skills. Students who successfully complete this program sequence will be prepared to take and pass the respective ASE/NATEF exam and will be prepared for postsecondary education opportunities.

Auto Body II Description: In this course, students are taught to repair, mask, and refinish auto body components and entire vehicles. In addition, they use spray guns and personal safety equipment while applying undercoats and topcoats, working with a variety of materials, and gaining career skills. Students who successfully complete this program sequence will be prepared to take and pass the respective ASE/NATEF exam and will be prepared for postsecondary education opportunities.

Auto Body III: This course allows students to further apply the tasks/competencies learned in Auto Body Technology I and II. This course may also be used as a capstone course in which students may perfect their auto body skills and move toward employment in the industry. Students who successfully complete this program sequence will be prepared to take and pass the respective ASE/NATEF exam and will be prepared for postsecondary education opportunities.

Electricity I & II *

Grade Level 11-12

Electricity I Description: Students develop skills in the installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of residential, commercial, and industrial electrical systems. They also study electrical theory, navigate the National Electrical Code Book, select and install conductors, and work with panelboards, switchboards, and generators.

Electricity II Description: Students continue to develop skills in the installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of residential, commercial, and industrial electrical systems. They also study electrical theory and mathematical problems related to electricity, navigate the National Electrical Code Book, select and install conductors, examine lighting, communication, and power systems, and work with conduit and raceways, panelboards, switchboards, grounding systems, and generators.

Criminal Justice I & II *

Grade Level: 11-12

Criminal Justice I Description: Students are introduced to the legal foundations and processes, and the principles, techniques, and practices for exploring careers within the criminal justice system.

Criminal Justice II Description: Students learn the legal foundations and processes, the principles, techniques, and practices for exploring careers within the criminal justice system, and the history of terrorism in the United States. Students combine classroom instruction and supervised, practical experience throughout the school year.

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CTE Courses at John Tyler Community College

Industrial Electricity I

Students receive the high school credit for course 17102DJ Electricity I

ELE 131
National Electrical Code I
(3 credits)

Provides comprehensive study of the purpose and interpretations of the National Electric Code as well as familiarization and implementation of various charts, code rulings and wiring methods including state and local regulations. Lecture: 3 hours per week.

ELE 150
A.C. and D.C. Circuit Fundamentals
(4 credits)
Provides an intensive study of the fundamentals of direct and
alternating current, resistance, magnetism, inductance and
capacitance, with emphasis on practical applications. Focuses on electrical/machines applications. Lecture: 3 hours.
Laboratory: 2 hours.
Total: 5 hours per week.

Industrial Electricity II

Students receive the high school credit for course 17102DJ2 Electricity II

ELE 138
National Electrical Code Review I
(3 credits)

Covers purpose and interpretation of the National Electrical Code as well as various charts, code rulings and wiring methods. Prepares the student to take the journeyman-level exam.

Lecture: 3 hours per week.

ELE 151
Electrical Troubleshooting
(3 credits)

Teaches troubleshooting as applied to residential wiring and/or electrical appliances.

Lecture: 2 hours.
Laboratory: 3 hours.
Total: 5 hours per week.

Precision Machining I

Students received HS credit for 8538DJ Precision Machining Tech. I

MAC 121 – 122
Computer Numerical Control I – II
(3 credits each)
Focuses on numerical control techniques in metal forming and machine processes. Includes theory and practice in lathe and milling machine computer numerical control program writing, setup and operation. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. Total: 3 hours per week.

MAC 163 – 164
Machine Shop Practices III – IV
(3 credits each)
Offers practice in the operation of the drill press, engine lathe,
vertical milling machine, horizontal milling machine and the surface grinder. Introduces practical heat treatment of directly hardenable steels commonly used in machine shops.
Lecture: 2 hours.
Laboratory: 3 hours.
Total: 5 hours per week.

Precision Machining II

Students received HS credit for 8540DJ Precision Machining Tech. II

MAC 121 – 122
Computer Numerical Control I – II
(3 credits each)
Focuses on numerical control techniques in metal forming and machine processes. Includes theory and practice in lathe and milling machine computer numerical control program writing, setup and operation. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. Total: 3 hours per week.

MAC 163 – 164
Machine Shop Practices III – IV
(3 credits each)
Offers practice in the operation of the drill press, engine lathe,
vertical milling machine, horizontal milling machine and the surface grinder. Introduces practical heat treatment of directly hardenable steels commonly used in machine shops.
Lecture: 2 hours.
Laboratory: 3 hours.
Total: 5 hours per week.

Welding Program I

Student receive HS credit for 8672DJ Welding I

WEL 116
Welding I (Oxyacetylene)
(2 credits)

Teaches oxygen/acetylene welding and cutting including
safety of equipment, welding, brazing and soldering
procedures
and cutting procedures. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 3
hours.
Total: 4 hours per week.

WEL 123
Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Basic)
(3 credits)

Teaches operation of AC and DC power sources, welding
polarities, heats and electrodes for use in joining various
metal alloys by the arc welding process. Deals with running
beads, butt and fillet welds in all positions. Emphasizes
safety procedures. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours.
Total: 6 hours per week.

WEL 150
Welding Drawing and Interpretation
(2 credits)

Teaches fundamentals required for successful drafting as
applied to the welding industry. Includes blueprint reading,
geometric principles of drafting and freehand sketching,
basic principles of orthographic projection, preparation of
drawings and interpretation of symbols.
Lecture: 2 hours per week.

WEL 160
Gas Metal Arc Welding
(3 credits)

Introduces semi-automatic welding processes with emphasis
on practical application. Includes the study of filler wires, fluxes and gases. Lecture: 2 hours.
Laboratory: 4 hours.
Total: 6 hours per week.

Welding Program II

Student receive HS credit for 8673DJ Welding II

WEL 130
Inert Gas Welding
(3 credits)

Introduces practical operations in the uses of inert-gasshield
arc welding. Discusses equipment, safety operations,
welding practice in the various positions, process
applications and manual and semi-automatic welding.
Lecture: 2 hours.
Laboratory: 4 hours.
Total: 6 hours per week.

WEL 141
Welder Qualification Tests I
(3 credits)

Studies techniques and practices of testing welded joints through destructive and non-destructive testing. Part I of II.
Lecture: 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week.
Total: 5 hours per week.

WEL 199 – Welding Supervised Study

WEL 244
Weld Testing and Codes
(2 credits)

Covers non-destructive (NDT) weld testing and how it plays
a critical role in assuring that structural components and
materials meet specified requirements. Examines how and why these NDT processes are used and will use them to test welds and weldments. Lecture: 1 hour.
Laboratory: 3 hours.
Total: 4 hours per week.

Early Childhood Education I

This Career Studies Certificate (CSC) provides students with the knowledge and skills required to work with young children birth to age eight and is at Level 4 of the Virginia Career Pathways for Early Childhood and Out-of-School Time Practitioners, where Level 3 is a Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential and Level 9 a doctoral degree. The curriculum is designed to benefit persons currently employed or seeking employment working with young children in settings such as preschools, child care centers and homes, Head Start and Early Head Start programs, and before-and-after school programs. Students completing this program will have earned 16 of the 34 credits needed for the Early Childhood Certificate (Pathways Level 5) and 16 of the 67 credits required for the Early Childhood Development Associate of Applied Science degree (Pathways Level 6).

Note: This is a Concurrent Enrollment Program.

Mechanical Maintenance

This Career Studies Certificate (CSC) provides students with hands-on training for maintaining and repairing mechanical equipment.  For more information, please go to

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